Kikagaku Moyo

Bio

To anyone who has heard the music of Kikagaku Moyo, it should come as no surprise that the band’s origins lie in hours upon hours of late-night jamming, illuminated by nothing more than the geometric patterns playing behind the band’s eyelids, resulting in a natural, free-floating sound, as of-the-earth as it is intergalactic. It may be surprising that the band sharpened their improvisational skills by busking on the streets of their native Tokyo. It may be surprising that the band’s overall sound may owe as much or more to the Incredible String Band as it does to Acid Mother’s Temple.

But what’s perhaps most surprising about Forest of Lost Children, the band’s face-melting, recorded-ritual sophomore album, is how utterly centered and mature the band sounds, especially given their relatively short lifespan as a band. Boundless though they may be, Kikagaku Moyo here sound anything but lost, their child-like wonder manifested in a confident, courageous exploration of sound. Labels – psychedelic, folk, prog-rock, psychedelic-folk-mixed-with-prog-rock – do little to accurately reflect the spectrum of influences on display, let alone the more impactful realization of completeness in Kikagaku Moyo’s songs.

Easily one of the most shimmering crown-jewels in the rapidly expanding BBiB catalog, look for Kikagaku Moyo and Forest of Lost Children to be found taking shape in the expanded minds of listeners everywhere.

Press

Revolt of the Apes:

Band of the Week “Boundless though they may be, Kikagaku Moyo here sound anything but lost, their child-like wonder manifested in a confident, courageous exploration of sound. Labels – psychedelic, folk, prog-rock, psychedelic-folk-mixed-with-prog-rock– do little to accurately reflect the spectrum of influences on display, let alone the more impactful realization of completeness in Kikagaku Moyo’s songs…Easily one of the most shimmering crown-jewels in the rapidly expanding BBiB catalog, look for Kikagaku Moyo and “Forest of Lost Children” to be found taking shape in the expanded minds of listeners everywhere”

Backseat Mafia:

Kikagaku’s third album (and second of 2014: they both make this list) contains some more obvious song structures than their previous offering, Mammatus Clouds. The sitar is still there as well as the jamming, the drone and the freak outs but its more condensed with the vocals more pronounced and dominant. Thats not a criticism by the way….oh, no. This is Kikagaku at the top of the game. A real contender for album of the year. And live, these new songs sound even better.

Best Albums of 2014 on Death and Taxes:

“To put it simply: this album will melt your face off. The center track, “Smoke And Mirrors” is without a question one of the most devastatingly beautiful seven minutes ever captured on tape, and regardless of your musical preference, you’re going to dig this one.”

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Contact

kurosawago963850@gmail.com

2019-11-21T02:21:19+00:00