Heaters

Bio

July 2017: Introducing “Matterhorn”…

“Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose,” sayeth the French. Just more than a year ago, Heaters shepherded the release of “Baptistina” into the world, which itself followed their debut album, “Holy Water Pool,” by less than a year. Now, the Michigan-made music machine is set to lay claim to a new parcel of mountainous terrain, in the form of their latest release on Beyond Beyond Is Beyond, entitled “Matterhorn.”

It’s a relentless pace, made all the more impressive not by the infrequency with which its met by Heaters peers, but rather by the lasting quality of each release. In this way, “Matterhorn” is more of the same—thirty-eight minutes of propulsive, precisely sculpted sonic signatures. In other crucial ways, however, “Matterhorn” represents massive change for Heaters: first, in the form of a largely revamped line-up, and second, in the form of an album whose wave crests above even the band’s previous high-water marks of consistency.

Short of attending group therapy together, it’s difficult to ascertain exactly what contributions these new sparks have contributed to Heaters overall sound, just as it’s impossible to dismiss how utterly ignited by change “Matterhorn” sounds as a result. If “Baptistina” showed a picture of a band attaining greater control over their quite-rideable waves of reverb and rhythm, “Matterhorn” is the master-class in its execution. It’s a full-screen image of dawn, dusk and darkness, never scanned-and-panned, and never less than mesmerizing. At the risk of putting too fine a point on it, the landlocked levitation previously made possible via Heaters psycho-surf majesty is luminously leavened on “Matterhorn,” with the bright light of the jingle-jangle morning (which may or may not come following you—but will likely lead to repeat listens).

“Black Bolt” and “Bronze Behavior” offer a one-two punch, revealing that these changes may have been hiding in plain sight the entire time. It sounds like Heaters – the pace is pushed, the ride-cymbal is ridden, and the guitar lines shimmer and sway with a kind of effortless bliss and ease. Still, there’s something instantly different in the tone and tenor, as if some sand and sea-foam has been dislodged from the band’s collective ears. By the hypnotic, ending coda of “Bronze Behavior,” it’s clear Heaters are going for the gold, the guitars ringing ruefully like an unearthed, semi-water-logged Wedding Present deep cut, or perhaps an answer to the unasked musical question, “Does Johnny Marr surf?”

The album’s eight songs pair together almost congenitally, “Kingsday” and “Hochelaga” going hand-in-hand, followed by “Pearls” and “Séance,” two duos with almost symmetrical sheen. But the album highlight may be its majestic album-opening power-pairing of “Thanksgiving I” and Thanksgiving II.” It’s the sound of Heaters fully illuminated, with broad and bold slashes of echo effectively energizing the proceedings to provide a panoramic view that confirms “Matterhorn” sees the band reaching previously unclimbed heights.

Nothing stays the same – everything changes. Let’s be thankful for that, and let’s be thankful for Heaters. – Ryan Muldoon (Revolt of the Apes)

Press

“…their energy and hook writing are clearly on point.” — Pitchfork

“…the trio add their own twist, merging lysergic hooks with driving garage-rock…to make something that races ahead of their peers.” — NME

THE REVUE premier of “Propane”:

“‘Propane’, is a psychedelic rock meets surf-rock song that embraces the psychedelic flurries of Ty Segall and Thee Oh Sees and the blistering rock ‘n roll of Futurebirds.“

VILLAGE VOICE “Propane” Premiere:

“Words stretch and melt into twanging, twisting guitar solos that would easily inspire Dick Dale to get down, while the contrast of crashing, crystal-clear cymbals build a cacophonous beat. Like a faded radio transmission from some golden era of surf psych, ‘Propane’ blasts through its own haze to leave an indelible burn.”

http://www.villagevoice.com/music/exclusive-listen-to-heaters-newest-track-propane-before-their-4knots-set-7348271

DIAMOND DEPOSITS:

“‘Mean Green’ has an merciless meandering riff heavy melody that will stick to your bones like a home cooked meal.”

NOISEY “Kamikaze” Premiere:

“If you’re into reverb, spaced out garage rock, and not really understanding what a song is about because you can’t quite hear the lyrics but you’re definitely vibing on the groove, then ‘Kamikaze’ by Grand Rapids-based trio Heaters will certainly make your nipples rather erect.”

http://noisey.vice.com/blog/premiere-heaters—kamikaze

SLY VINYL:

“Eight miles high, through the purple haze, past Lucy and well above the byrds lies the Holy Water Pool. Legend has it that the pool inhabits the purest water in the cosmos. Plus, the jukebox is stuffed with solid jams and the vending machine has the best name-brand candy around. Michigan cosmicagicians Heaters are the gatekeepers, and they’ll let you in if you promise to share your stash.”

July 2017: Introducing “Matterhorn”…

“Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose,” sayeth the French. Just more than a year ago, Heaters shepherded the release of “Baptistina” into the world, which itself followed their debut album, “Holy Water Pool,” by less than a year. Now, the Michigan-made music machine is set to lay claim to a new parcel of mountainous terrain, in the form of their latest release on Beyond Beyond Is Beyond, entitled “Matterhorn.”

It’s a relentless pace, made all the more impressive not by the infrequency with which its met by Heaters peers, but rather by the lasting quality of each release. In this way, “Matterhorn” is more of the same—thirty-eight minutes of propulsive, precisely sculpted sonic signatures. In other crucial ways, however, “Matterhorn” represents massive change for Heaters: first, in the form of a largely revamped line-up, and second, in the form of an album whose wave crests above even the band’s previous high-water marks of consistency.

Short of attending group therapy together, it’s difficult to ascertain exactly what contributions these new sparks have contributed to Heaters overall sound, just as it’s impossible to dismiss how utterly ignited by change “Matterhorn” sounds as a result. If “Baptistina” showed a picture of a band attaining greater control over their quite-rideable waves of reverb and rhythm, “Matterhorn” is the master-class in its execution. It’s a full-screen image of dawn, dusk and darkness, never scanned-and-panned, and never less than mesmerizing. At the risk of putting too fine a point on it, the landlocked levitation previously made possible via Heaters psycho-surf majesty is luminously leavened on “Matterhorn,” with the bright light of the jingle-jangle morning (which may or may not come following you—but will likely lead to repeat listens).

“Black Bolt” and “Bronze Behavior” offer a one-two punch, revealing that these changes may have been hiding in plain sight the entire time. It sounds like Heaters – the pace is pushed, the ride-cymbal is ridden, and the guitar lines shimmer and sway with a kind of effortless bliss and ease. Still, there’s something instantly different in the tone and tenor, as if some sand and sea-foam has been dislodged from the band’s collective ears. By the hypnotic, ending coda of “Bronze Behavior,” it’s clear Heaters are going for the gold, the guitars ringing ruefully like an unearthed, semi-water-logged Wedding Present deep cut, or perhaps an answer to the unasked musical question, “Does Johnny Marr surf?”

The album’s eight songs pair together almost congenitally, “Kingsday” and “Hochelaga” going hand-in-hand, followed by “Pearls” and “Séance,” two duos with almost symmetrical sheen. But the album highlight may be its majestic album-opening power-pairing of “Thanksgiving I” and Thanksgiving II.” It’s the sound of Heaters fully illuminated, with broad and bold slashes of echo effectively energizing the proceedings to provide a panoramic view that confirms “Matterhorn” sees the band reaching previously unclimbed heights.

Nothing stays the same – everything changes. Let’s be thankful for that, and let’s be thankful for Heaters. – Ryan Muldoon (Revolt of the Apes)

Previous Releases

If it takes any more than fifteen seconds to hear what “mean” means to the Michigan men who make up Heaters, pick up the needle and start again. “Mean Green” is the A-side track of the band’s new seven-inch single from Beyond Beyond is Beyond Records, presenting a surf-centric slab of sonic stomp that doubles as a definition of “mean.”

In the case of Heaters, “mean” is meant in the context that might be used to describe a 1970 GTO piloted by a jittery Warren Oates – not belligerent, but aggressive, blank-eyes staring at the horizon, fueled by dread and ready to accelerate into the nearest dangerous curve.

What’s “green” about “Mean Green” then seems to be Heaters ability to glide into this path naturally, snaking absolutely without hesitation through the song’s tight turns in a way that’s insistent and invigorating. The flipside of the single, “Levitate Thigh,” proves the band to be possessed by the power of rock and roll, initially bringing the tempo to a stuttering slow-roll, before Heaters are once again the willing captives of a Seeds-level web of sounds, guitar snarl, feedback and drums creating the trap in which the band has no chance – and no desire – to escape.

– RevoltoftheApes.com

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heatersmichigan@gmail.com

2019-11-19T03:10:07+00:00